Coastal GasLink pipe sections on the ground at the Port of Stewart this week. (Coastal GasLink photo)

Coastal GasLink pipe sections on the ground at the Port of Stewart this week. (Coastal GasLink photo)

Coastal GasLink repeats desire for meeting with hereditary chiefs

Coastal GasLink says they’re ready to meet with the hereditary chiefs at their convenience

Coastal GasLink’s (CGL) president is once again requesting to meet with the hereditary chiefs.

In a Jan. 17 press release David Pfeiffer said the company’s its main concern is the safety of people using the Morice West Forest Service Road.

The requests for meetings come after RCMP officers discovered a number of hazards, such as fuel-soaked rags and piles of tires filled with kindling, next to multiple felled trees around the 39.5-kilometre mark of the road.

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“The photographs that have been released previously showing half-cut trees and tire piles with accelerants do not give the appearance of peaceful opposition to our project and instead show dangerous obstructions to our crews, law enforcement officials, the public or protesters who are traveling along the Morice West Forest Service Road.

“To this end, we would appreciate the opportunity to meet and understand the concerns of the Office of the Wet’suwet’en and discuss the actions that are taking place behind the barricades.”

CGL say they remain committed to finding a peaceful solution to the issues expressed by Na’Moks and other hereditary chiefs.

The company says it’s ready to meet with the hereditary chiefs at their convenience.

The Interior News has reached out for comment from the hereditary chiefs, who have stated repeatedly in the past they have no desire to meet with CGL and instead want to meet with RCMP, federal and provincial decisionmakers to find a solution to the issue.



trevor.hewitt@interior-news.com

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