The BV Backpackers have plans for outings on most weekends, including throughout the winter. You only have to experience mountain beauty like this once to get hooked on the idea of excursions though the local areas. Contributed photo

Getting between the top and bottom of the valley

BV Backpackers hike, ski and snowshoe their way through the Bulkley Valley.

While some of us are quite content to enjoy the beauty of this part of the country from the bottom of the valley looking up or from the top of the ski hill looking down, more than a few individuals enjoy being out there in the backcountry tramping over traditional trails and exploring sights the rest of us can only imagine.

The BV Backpackers Society is a group of dedicated backwoods hikers who find ways to get out into the backcountry to walk, ski and snowshoe. Every weekend they have events planned so that they can enjoy the beauty of a land that has not yet been totally integrated into the metropolitan streets of what has become a sprawl that most people have come to accept as part of modern life.

Each season brings its own challenges. This group embraces those challenges heartily and enjoys the different styles of trudging up and over hills as well as away from that busyness we all seem to take as normal.

Some snow on the trail? No problem. How deep? What kind of snow, wet or powdery? How cold?

A few questions later, perhaps there is an answer to which equipment is needed before they head out.

Jay Gilden, president of the club, enthusiastically described the weekly hikes. Usually held on Sunday, most of the hikes attract eight to 10 members. This weekend for example, there were eight people who used snowshoes or cross-country skis to head out to the Sunny Point area while another half dozen went up Harvey Mountain with backcountry skis.

“We usually get between 12 and 25 people depending on the hike and the weather,” he said.

“Every once in a while we’ll do an overnighter with eight to 10 people but we don’t do them that often.”

Gilden referred to the club’s website bvbackpackers.ca and newsletter for details on scheduling.

He also said that quite often, groups of individuals within the club will get together to make their own plans for hikes and excursions.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Provincial COVID-19 data can now be used for B.C. to prepare for a second wave

In the past week, B.C. has seen a slight spike in daily test-positive case counts

Four air ambulance flights out of Terrace delayed or cancelled

Pandemic precautions caused nighttime closure of service station providing weather data to pilots

Skeena Resources, Tahltan prez excited by purchase of Eskay Creek

Skeena gets full control of mine, Barrick gets 12 per cent of Skeena and a one per cent royalty

Seabridge Gold starts drilling along proposed tunnel route north of Stewart

Twin tunnels will connect the KSM mine to its mill and tailings site

Mother grizzly bear with two cubs spotted on Gruchy’s Beach trail near Terrace

Conservation officers also warning public to stay away from Grizzlies on lower Kitimat River

Wage subsidy will be extended until December amid post-COVID reopening: Trudeau

Trudeau said the extension will ‘give greater certainty and support to businesses’

Tree planters get help with COVID-19 protective measures

Ottawa funds extra transportation, sanitizing for crews

Trudeau apologizes for not recusing himself from WE decision

He says his and his family’s longtime involvement with the WE organization should have kept him out of the discussions

Beverly Hills 90210 star’s family selling Vancouver Island Beach Resort

You can own Jason Priestley’s Terrace Beach Resort in Ucluelet for less than $5 million

Islanders want BC Ferries to follow order that lets residents board before tourists

For ferry-dependent communities, ferries are often the sole practical lifeline to work, school or medical appointments.

Washington’s NFL team drops ‘Redskins’ name after 87 years

The franchise was given the name back in 1933, when it was still in Boston

Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

The kinds of genetic technology being used for this project did not exist when SARS hit Canada in 2003

Most Read