The right to be born

Over the past century, most democratic societies have taken steps to overcome prejudice and to recognize personhood and rights of others.

Editor:

Over the past century, most democratic societies have taken steps to overcome prejudice and to recognize personhood and rights of others.

In Canada, the famous “Persons Case” in 1929 established the personhood of women and their right to equal treatment before the law.

This included the right to vote which had previously been denied them by the Supreme Court.

In 1960, First Nations people were recognized as legal persons in Canada and were granted the right to vote.

The denial of personhood has been the scourge of civilizations around the globe and throughout human history.

In the USA, blacks were treated as subhuman by wealthy slaveholders.

In Germany, Jews were denied their rights and their humanity.

Today in Canada, little people not yet born are deemed non-persons under a 400-year-old law and have no legal protection until the moment of complete birth.

An estimated 100,000 of them are killed by abortion every year.

MP Stephen Woodworth has proposed a motion (M-312) asking Parliament to form a committee to examine the medical evidence we have today to determine when human life begins.

We mustn’t be afraid to discuss this issue of human life, which is a sacred gift from our Creator.

Both PM Harper and MP Nathan Cullen intend to vote against this important motion.

Please let them know you care about little people and ask them to support M-312.

History will judge us by how we treat our fellow human beings.

Rod Taylor

Telkwa