Playing it forward; a violin finds a new home

Brenda isn’t waiting to go before letting go of some of her stuff

I have a question for you this week. Have you made your will? You are no doubt more organized than I am and have your affairs in order. I do have a will that was made some years ago. Things change and I realized I need to have another look at the document.

I don’t have a lot of anything to leave to folks so what I have done over the last few years is I have given things away. It is a nice feeling for me and I hope a good one for the recipients as well. A few things of value have gone to family members and other items have gone to younger friends.

One thing I passed on was my violin. Not too long ago I was told my violin was in university. Such a beautiful instrument and I know for sure the young lady who plays it has made me quite proud.

LAST WEEK: Youth inspiring change

For sure that violin has had quite a life beginning some 70 years ago when my parents paid $50 for it. It is a Stradivarius copy made in France. The violin was my second instrument. The first one was soon too small for me. Same reason why the violin went to its new person.

I remember when I was seven years old the violin and I walked to the high school every week to play in the symphony orchestra. When that part of the playing was over it was off to university. We played in a violin quartet for a bit and for sure in a few bars. Even had a set in Vancouver with Sonny Terry and Brownie Magee. I also played the spoons with them. (I mean I used actual spoons.)

Played for my students when I taught school. Played in a couple bands for dances in Cassiar and Atlin. A few jigs and reels were played around the campfire in the gold fields of Atlin.

MORE SPICE OF LIFE: Celebrating the joys of fall

The travels were over and the fiddling as well.

For the next few years the violin hung on the wall reminding me of the playing I did and telling me my old hands could no longer hit a clear note. Now the music plays on in the capable hands of the young woman. Now isn’t that grand?

So the whole point of this discussion of wills is that maybe you could give something of value away so you know that whatever it was has gone to a good place. As we get older we seem to be trying to get rid of stuff. Give it away so someone else can enjoy it.

If you have a simple will it might not cost too much. You can buy a will kit for very little. For my money, I would rather a lawyer do it for me so I know it has been done correctly. It has been said that having a will done takes a little of the worry away about what’s next.

By the way on this day of October 1, I have a lone hummingbird. I have had a report from Smithers from a reader who has two Anna’s hummingbirds. The one here is a Rufous.

Thanks for the calls that come to 250-846-5095 and the email notes that come to mallory@bulkley.net.



mallory@bulkley.net

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