Feds get it wrong on cannabis edibles, but this shouldn’t be hard to digest

Feds get it wrong on cannabis edibles, but this shouldn’t be hard to digest

New regulations surrounding cannabis edibles, extracts will lose provinces money

It’s almost as though the feds are trying to lose money.

As Smithers’ own pot shop opened its doors Oct. 17, the federal Cannabis Act opened its doors to cannabis edibles and extracts with a number of rules and regulations on their sale coming into effect.

Let’s start with the good: Canadians now have the ability to buy cannabis in edible or extract form.

That’s a much healthier way to ingest the various cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids beyond the well-known Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) which a barrage of studies coming out of places like Portugal and Spain are pointing to as the key puzzle pieces to maximizing the medicinal effects of cannabis through things like the synergistic interaction between cannabinoids.

LAST WEEK’S TREV THOUGHTS: You don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone

Edibles also can’t be “appealing to kids”, which is another positive (however I’m a little unclear on how this works as I would argue brownies and cookies — some of the most common edibles — are pretty kid-friendly).

I wish I could offer more praise, but these new rules are horrible.

By far the most notable restriction is capping edibles off at 10 milligrams of THC per package.

For perspective, I have friends back in Ontario who use cannabis to deal with conditions from scoliosis (high THC for pain and inflammation) to epilepsy (1:1 ratio of cannabidiol [CBD] to THC for pain management and anticonvulsant properties) to PTSD/depression (pure CBD or high CBD/low THC for mostly anti-anxiety and neuroprotective properties).

They all (legally) produce their own medicine, however I asked them if they would ever consider purchasing under the new regulations.

It was a resounding no (even the one who used CBD said it’s much cheaper for her to make her own).

Two of these individuals use over 150 mg of THC daily. Let’s say a 10mg edible costs two dollars (believe me — it will be more). That’s $30/day in medicine. All of a sudden the once-touted cheap alternative medicine is looking a lot pricier.

My prediction is this specific regulation will lead to low edible sales because the vast majority of edible users simply won’t be able to afford them.

That brings me to my other main issue with regulations: Neither edibles nor extracts may make health claims.

In the case of the latter, I get it: we’re just now beginning to recognize that perhaps vaporizing nicotine and cannabis isn’t as safe as once thought.

However in the case of edibles I disagree.

MORE TREV THOUGHTS: Who watches the watchmen?

THC has been shown to inhibit in-vitro (within a test tube) growth of tumour cells; why can’t a producer adhering to rigorous testing standards mention this?

Likewise, there are many studies about the beneficial properties of CBD in helping with seizures, depression and PTSD.

We have no problem letting psychiatrists prescribe our ten-year-olds adderall because Big Pharma has said it helps with ADHD; why can’t a high-CBD brownie mention CBD has anticonvulsant properties and temporarily reduces stress and anxiety?

Because money.

There are already many antidepressants and anticonvulsants on the market; why would Johnson & Johnson put money into research that shows their customers a drug they can make at home for much cheaper is as good as one they currently push?

They wouldn’t.

I guess the silvery-green lining is despite the current stranglehold the medical-industrial complex has on cannabis regulations, the cultural zeitgeist is shifting.

At the start of the 21st century our medicinal understanding of cannabis was limited to a small number of circumstantial, non-peer reviewed studies.

Not even 20 years later, we know there are at least 113 different cannabinoids which all bind to our cannabinoid receptors and are expressed throughout both the central and peripheral nervous systems in their own unique ways.

We know they can affect things like tumour growth, appetite, sensory perception, pain, mood and memory.

We know that temperatures involved in cooking and extract processes increase bioavailability of these cannabinoids, flavonoids and terpenes much more than traditional combustion of dried cannabis flowers.

What don’t we know?

Why the government has decided to (financially) restrict access to these medicinal compounds, as opposed to the least healthy method of cannabis use.

Joke’s on them, you can just make it yourself.



trevor.hewitt@interior-news.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

(BC Hydro photo)
BC Hydro planned power outages to darken downtown Smithers for most of day Sunday, Jan 17

Replacement of poles will affect approximately 250 customers in downtown core from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Smithers Local Health Area reported 25 new cases of COVID-19 Jan. 3 - 9. (BC CDC graphic)
Weekly new cases of COVID-19 rise to 25 in Smithers LHA Jan. 3 – 9

Northern Health reported 49 new daily cases for 497 active, 44 hospitalized, 13 in critical care

The first of two massive turbines headed from Prince Rupert for the Site C Dam near Fort St. John on Jan 10. (Photo: Supplied by Tasha McKenzie)
Massive turbines begin trek across Northwestern B.C.

Hydro-Electric turbines headed from Prince Rupert to Site C Dam week of Jan. 10 to 14

A scene from “Canada and the Gulf War: In their own words,” a video by The Memory Project, a program of Historica Canada, is shown in this undated illustration. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Historica Canada
New video marks Canada’s contributions to first Gulf War on 30th anniversary

Veterans Affairs Canada says around 4,500 Canadian military personnel served during the war

A 17-year-old snowmobiler used his backcountry survival sense in preparation to spend the night on the mountain near 100 Mile House Saturday, Jan. 16, 2021 after getting lost. (South Cariboo Search and Rescue Facebook photo)
Teen praised for backcountry survival skills after getting lost in B.C.’s Cariboo mountains

“This young man did everything right after things went wrong.”

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole holds a press conference on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa on December 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
No place for ‘far right’ in Conservative Party, Erin O’Toole says

O’Toole condemned the Capitol attack as ‘horrifying’ and sought to distance himself and the Tories from Trumpism

A passer by walks in High Park, in Toronto, Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. This workweek will kick off with what’s fabled to be the most depressing day of the year, during one of the darkest eras in recent history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
‘Blue Monday’ getting you down? Exercise may be the cure, say experts

Many jurisdictions are tightening restrictions to curb soaring COVID-19 case counts

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
COVID-19: Provinces work on revised plans as Pfizer-BioNTech shipments to slow down

Anita Anand said she understands and shares Canadians’ concerns about the drug company’s decision

Tourists take photographs outside the British Columbia Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday August 26, 2011. A coalition of British Columbia tourism industry groups is urging the provincial government to not pursue plans to ban domestic travel to fight the spread of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. travel ban will harm struggling tourism sector, says industry coalition

B.C. government would have to show evidence a travel ban is necessary

(Phil McLachlan - Capital News)
‘Targeted’ shooting in Coquitlam leaves woman in hospital

The woman suffered non-life threatening injuries in what police believe to be a targeted shooting Saturday morning

JaHyung Lee, “Canada’s oldest senior” at 110 years old, received his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. He lives at Amenida Seniors Community in Newton. (Submitted photo: Amenida Seniors Community)

Most Read