Duncan RCMP officer won’t face charges over injury during arrest of youth. (File photo)

B.C. RCMP officer won’t face charges in arrest of youth who suffered arm injuries

Youth injured in arrest over slashed tires

An RCMP officer on Vancouver Island didn’t do anything wrong during the arrest of a youth who suffered injuries to his arm, and won’t be charged with any offences.

The incident took place on Feb. 2 in Duncan, and involved three youths that were arrested for slashing tires.

The Independent Investigations Office of BC, the civilian oversight agency responsible for examining and investigating incidents involving on or off-duty police officers in the province, concluded that the evidence collected does not provide grounds to consider any charges against the officer.

RELATED: B.C. RCMP officer cleared after Taser incident seriously injures woman

On Feb. 2, RCMP officers were responding to a complaint about the youths slashing car tires near the roundabout on Sherman Road and Canada Avenue when the officer in question saw the youths running and attempting to hide when they saw the police car.

The officer exited the vehicle and approached one of the youths advising him that he was under arrest for mischief.

The youth told the officer that he had done nothing wrong and attempted to walk away.

A second officer took the youth’s arm and told him he was under arrest and the youth again said he had done nothing wrong and attempted to walk away.

The first officer used a “bear hug” to take the youth to the ground and used his body weight to control the suspect.

The youth continued to to resist arrest by refusing to give the officers his arm.

A third officer arrived and ordered the youth to put his arm behind his back and, when he failed to comply, the officer then used force to place the arm behind the suspect’s back.

The youth claimed that his right arm was pulled so hard that he felt his ligaments pull.

The youth was arrested and brought to the RCMP detachment where he was placed in a cell.

The other two youths were arrested without incident.

The youth who was hurt later admitted he gave a false name, date of birth and refused to give police his parents’ contact details.

RELATED: B.C. RCMP officer charged after elderly woman struck by police vehicle

The youth’s mother later picked him up at the detachment and took him home.

When the youth awoke a few hours later, he told his mother his arm was hurting.

He said his arm hurt when he was at the detachment, but he didn’t tell anyone because he was angry.

The next day, he was taken to the hospital where it was determined that he had a fracture in the elbow joint and two fractures in his arm.

After investigating the incident, the IIOBC concluded that the officers had lawful authority and reasonable grounds to arrest the youths.

The information the IIOBC received was that a sharp object had been used in slashing the tires and that provided a basis for caution on the part of the officers in dealing with the youths.

The youth also stated he refused arrest and the IIOBC determined the officers were justified in using force to apply the handcuffs.

“Accordingly, I do not consider that any officer had committed an offence under any enactment and, therefore, the matter will not be referred to Crown counsel for consideration of charges,” said chief civilian director Ronald MacDonald.

Robert

Just Posted

Focus should be on cleaning up our own backyard

Reducing and reusing more effective than recycling

Transfer station experiences uptick in usage after Smithers, Telkwa suspend curbside recycling

In the wake of a May 9 fire Recycle BC has been experiencing an uptick in usage.

Hazelton Secondary School withdraws notices for temporary dress code

Parents previously told the Interior News they felt there was inadequate consultation over the rules

Ramona Wilson Memorial Walk: Twenty-five years, but still no closure

“What we’re standing for today is that nobody is going to sweep this under the rug, nobody.”

Muheim class repeats 2017 award for interaction with seniors

Liliana Pesce’s Grade 4-5 class honoured by BC Retired Teachers Association

VIDEO: B.C. First Nation plans to launch legal challenge after Trans Mountain approval

Meanwhile, Premier John Horgan says he’ll continue to defend the B.C. coast

Life’s work of talented B.C. sculptor leads to leukemia

Former Salmon Arm resident warns of dangers of chemical contact

Billboard posted along B.C.’s Highway of Tears to remember missing and murdered Indigenous women

Billboards featuring Indigenous artwork to be placed in Surrey, Kamloops and near Prince George

Federal cabinet ministers visit Edmonton, Calgary, in wake of TMX approval

Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi is set to visit Trans Mountain Corp.’s terminal in Edmonton

B.C. municipality prepares to forbid overnight camping by homeless despite court ruling

While courts have ruled against blanket bans, Langley City is employing a site-by-site approach

B.C. auditor says Indigenous grad rate highest ever but education gaps exist

The percentage of Indigenous students graduating from B.C. public high schools has hit its highest level ever

Statistics Canada reports annual pace of inflation rises in May to 2.4%

Transportation prices gained 3.1 per cent as the cost of air transportation added 8.9 per cent

Rich U.S. donors fund anti-oil activism, meeting hears

Much of the organized opposition to oil and gas development in Canada… Continue reading

MPs hear retired B.C. nurse’s petition to change compensation for fatal medical errors

Teri McGrath wants provinces to implement no-fault system for medical errors

Most Read