Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland take part in the opening session of the 10th ministerial meeting of the Lima Group in Ottawa on Monday, Feb. 4, 2019. Canada’s slow economic growth and poor competitiveness are undercutting its global interests, experts say, as the post-“sunny ways” version of the Trudeau government’s foreign policy emerges Wednesday with the announcement of a new cabinet. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland take part in the opening session of the 10th ministerial meeting of the Lima Group in Ottawa on Monday, Feb. 4, 2019. Canada’s slow economic growth and poor competitiveness are undercutting its global interests, experts say, as the post-“sunny ways” version of the Trudeau government’s foreign policy emerges Wednesday with the announcement of a new cabinet. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Trudeau to take sober approach to unveiling new cabinet for minority mandate

Liberals survived a bruising campaign that diminished Trudeau’s stature as a champion of diversity

It will be all business this afternoon when Justin Trudeau unveils a cabinet to navigate a new era of minority government in a bitterly divided country.

Forget the theatricality and sunny optimism of 2015. Adoring crowds thronged the grounds of Rideau Hall, cheering as the new Liberal prime minister and his gender-equal team of fresh-faced ministers paraded triumphantly up the curving drive to the governor general’s residence, serenaded by bagpipes.

This time, there’s been no open invitation to the public to attend the official launch of Trudeau’s second mandate and watch on large screen TVs set up on the grounds of Rideau Hall as ministers take their oaths of office.

Ministers will arrive individually for the ceremony and make themselves available briefly afterwards to speak with reporters — the traditional, relatively low-key way cabinet shuffles are conducted.

The more sober approach is a reflection of the sobering circumstances in which the governing party finds itself, reduced to a minority of seats in the House of Commons. It survived a bruising campaign that diminished Trudeau’s stature as a champion of diversity amid long-ago photos of him posing in blackface and left the Liberals shut out entirely in Alberta and Saskatchewan, where talk of western separatism has gotten louder since the Oct. 21 vote.

Trudeau has taken a full month since winning re-election to put together his new cabinet, twice as long as he took in 2015.

Like cabinets during his first mandate, this one will have an equal number of men and women and will attempt to balance various regional, ethnic and religious considerations.

Most, if not all, existing ministers are expected to remain in cabinet but, with the exception of at least Finance Minister Bill Morneau, many will move to new portfolios.

READ MORE: Justin Trudeau to name new ministers for minority mandate Wednesday

Likely the biggest shift will involve Chrystia Freeland, arguably Trudeau’s strongest cabinet performer who stickhandled tempestuous NAFTA negotiations with a mercurial Donald Trump administration in the United States.

Freeland, who has roots in Alberta although she represents a downtown Toronto riding, is widely expected to take on a pivotal role in bridging the divide between the federal Liberal government and irate conservative-led provinces, including Ontario and in the West, as deputy prime minister and minister in charge of a beefed-up intergovernmental affairs department, to be renamed domestic affairs.

Sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the highly confidential cabinet selection process, say Francois-Philippe Champagne will leave his current post at Infrastructure to take over from Freeland at Foreign Affairs.

Liberal insiders expect a larger roster than the current 34, with at least two newly elected MPs vaulted straight into cabinet and at least another two re-elected backbenchers elevated.

Apart from Freeland’s new role, insiders expect the most important portfolios to be filled will be Finance, Natural Resources and Environment, reflecting the Liberals’ priority of transitioning Canada off its heavy reliance on fossil fuels without deep-sixing the economy and further infuriating people in Canada’s oil-and-gas heartland, Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Jonathan Wilkinson, currently fisheries minister, will move to Environment, according to sources. He’ll be tasked with squaring the circle of satisfying the majority of Canadians who voted for parties that support stronger action on climate change and simultaneously satisfying the majority who voted for parties that support expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline to take Alberta oilsands crude to the B.C. coast for export overseas.

Although he represents a British Columbia riding, Wilkinson was born and raised in Saskatchewan, where he once worked for Roy Romanow’s NDP government. His Saskatchewan roots might help him address anger in that province over the federal Liberals’ climate policies.

Nova Scotian Bernadette Jordan, currently rural economic development minister, will take over Fisheries from Wilkinson.

Trudeau’s choice of government House leader will be equally important given the minority situation. He is expected to tap Montreal MP Pablo Rodriguez for the crucial task of ensuring that government legislation passes with the support of at least one opposition party.

Newcomer Steven Guilbeault, a prominent Quebec environmentalist, is expected to take over from Rodriguez at Canadian Heritage.

Joan Bryden, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

The Red Chris open pit mine approximately 80 km south of Dease Lake. The province and Tahltan will start negotiations on the first consent-based decision-making agreement ever to be negotiated under DRIPA with regards to two mining projects in northern B.C. (Newcrest Mining photo)
B.C. to begin DRIPA-based negotiations with Tahltan First Nation on two northwest mining projects

Negotiations on Red Chris and Eskay Creek mines to commence soon in accordance with Section 7 of DRIPA

President of the Tahltan Central Government, Chad Norman Day, surveys Tahltan territory by helicopter in this July 2019 handout photo. The Tahltan Nation and the British Columbia government have struck what officials say is a historic agreement for shared decision-making for the nation’s territory in northwestern B.C., a hot spot for mineral exploration. Day says the deal shows they are “getting closer and closer to a true nation-to-nation relationship.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Tahltan Central Government
Tahltan Nation, B.C. government sign agreement for shared decision-making

Deal commits the province and the northwest B.C. nation to developing a land-use plan

Tahltan First Nation wildlife guardian, Jarett Quock, above and below right, was awarded the Outstanding Individual Leadership Award by the Indigenous Leadership Initiative on June 3. (Photos courtesy Adam Amir)
Tahltan wildlife guardian receives outstanding leadership award

Jarett Quock’s contributions were recognised by the Indigenous Leadership Initiative

Taylor Bachrach, NDP MP for Skeena-Bulkley Valley addresses Parliament on June 7, in call for the federal government to stop fighting Indigenous children in court and to implement the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Call to Action. (Image: supplied from Facebook)
NDP motion calling for immediate reconciliation action passes

Skeena-Bulkley MP Taylor Bachrach addresses federal Parliament

The farmhouse in Glentanna where the founding meeting of the Bulkley Valley Credit Union took place on April 14, 1941. (BV Museum archive)
Bulkley Valley Credit Union announces finalists for legacy project donation

Community can vote for one of the three finalists from each area

A small pod of Pacific white-sided dolphins pass by close to shore in Campbell River June 16, 2021. Still capture from video courtesy of Kimberly Hart
VIDEO: Dolphin sunset captured from Vancouver Island shore

Spectacular setting for view of travelling pod of Pacific white-sided dolphins

Bella Bella is on B.C.’s Central Coast, accessible only by air and ocean. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)
B.C. provides $22 million for Heiltsuk development on Central Coast

Elders care home project, tourism, lumber mill supported

The federal government says it wants to ban most flavoured vaping products in a bid to reduce their appeal to youth. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Craig Mitchelldyer
Health Canada proposes ban on most vaping flavours it says appeal to youth

If implemented, the regulations would restrict all e-cigarette flavours except tobacco, mint and menthol

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Seth Rogan’s vibrant orange sculpture was sold for $7,000 above Vancouver Art Gallery’s initial estimation at auction Tuesday. June 15. (Heffel Fine Arts)
Vase made by Seth Rogen sells for $12,000 at Vancouver auction

The B.C.-born comedian has a new pot habit and it’s paying off

BC Lions running back John White IV (3) runs with the ball during first quarter CFL football action against the Ottawa Redblacks in Ottawa on Saturday, September 21, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle
BC Lions file trademark for new logo

Canadian Football League team files for new design on June 1

The remains of the Mid-Island Co-op in Whiskey Creek along the Alberni Highway on Friday, June 18, after a blaze the day before devastated the gas station. (Michael Briones photo)
VIDEO: Camper van explosion burns Vancouver Island gas station to the ground

Nine fire departments responded to the incident, no injuries reported

The Montreal Police logo is seen in Montreal on Wednesday, July 8, 2020. Some Quebec politicians are calling for an investigation after a video was released that appears to show a Montreal police officer with his leg on a young Black man’s neck during an arrest. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
Probe called for after video appearing to show Montreal officer’s knee on Black youth’s neck

Politicians call for investigation after clip evokes memories of George Floyd incident

A vial of AstraZeneca vaccine is seen at a mass COVID-19 vaccination clinic in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, April 22, 2021. The website for a Broadway theatre showing "Springsteen on Broadway" said it would only allow guests "fully vaccinated with an FDA-approved vaccine" — Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna or Johnson & Johnson. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
No Springsteen for you: AstraZeneca not good enough to qualify for Broadway ticket

Victoria area mayor among those unable to attend New York entertainment due to COVID-19 restriction

Most Read