Seabridge Gold Alaskan salmon complaint dismissed

Seabridge Gold inches one step closer to completing its mining project

Canada’s National Contact Point (NCP) has dismissed a complaint against Seabridge Gold by the South East Alaska Conservation Council against the company’s KSM mining project in northern British Columbia.

The NCP is a federal agency that operates within the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and promotes adherence to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s guidelines on multinational companies.

The South East Alaska Conservation Council was concerned the proposed KSM mine, which is 35 kilometres from the Alaskan border, would endanger the wild salmon habitat downstream in Alaska.

B.C. seeks to calm mining worries in Alaska

B.C. resists call for outside mine oversight

The council had asked the NCP to investigate whether Seabridge Gold had violated international guidelines on consultations with stakeholders, due diligence on environmental and human rights impacts, and disclosure of mitigation plans.

The NCP started its investigation in January. The announcement of its conclusion came Nov. 21.

“We’re pleased with the dismissal and the fact that the federal government, the NCP, did agree with the robustness of the environmental assessment review process that were completed in 2014,” said Brent Murphy, vice president of environmental affairs at Seabridge Gold.

Murphy said the next step for the project is to find a partner to operate the mine.

Approximately 2,500 jobs could be created during the construction phase of the project, a majority of which the company intends to fill with workers from British Columbia. Seabridge Gold has a regional office in Smithers.

“It will be a significant employer,” Murphy said. “During the operation [of the mine] we’re looking at about 1,000 jobs and again we would like to have a vast majority of the jobs from B.C.”

The hiring process won’t begin until after a partner for the project is found.

“Unfortunately, we’re still a ways away,” Murphy said. “[The hiring process] will be up, ultimately, to a new joint venture partner.”

mike.grace-dacosta@interior-news.com

Just Posted

Snowfall warning continues for parts of B.C.’s Interior

First significant snowfall of the season prompts Environment Canada warning

Coastal GasLink receives first delivery of pipe sections

Company expects to begin welding and pipe laying in 2020

Northwest B.C. physician receives Medal of Good Citizenship Award

Dr. Peter Newbery was one of 18 people in B.C. to get provincial recognition

Northern Society for Domestic Peace remembers women killed in Montreal Massacre 30 years ago

Society will hand out 14 red roses, one for each of the victims, to women who stop by office today

Petition calls for appeal of Luke Strimbold’s sentence for sex assault

Prosecution service says the former Burns Lake mayor’s case is under review

VIDEO: Boys help rescue Cariboo bear cub

The cub, weighing just 24lbs, has been taken to wildlife sanctuary in Northwest B.C. for the winter

$578: that’s how much your first distracted driving ticket will cost with recent premium hikes

Over 50 per cent of Canadians admitted to using phone while driving last year, according to study

Kelowna man attempts to steal bait bike from RCMP parking lot

38-year-old Brian Richard Harbison is facing several charges

‘Things haven’t changed enough:’ Ecole Polytechnique anniversary prompts reflection

Fourteen women were fatally shot by a gunman at the Montreal school on Dec. 6, 1989

Bear raids freezer, gorges on Island family’s Christmas baking

Hungry bruin virtually ignored meat and fish, focused, instead, on the sweets

B.C. pharmaceutical company’s stocks double in value after successful lupus drug trial

More than 40 per cent of patients using voclosporin saw improvements in kidney function

Second warning on romaine lettuce from California region as another E. coli case reported

Two cases of E. coli have been reported in relation to the illness in the U.S.

Residents in B.C. city could face 133% tax hike in ‘worst case’ lawsuit outcome: report

An average home could see a tax increase of $2,164 in one year

B.C. Transit finds 28 used fareboxes online, saves $300,000

‘Someone joked maybe we can buy used fareboxes on eBay,’ CEO says

Most Read