Not the time for vacation: Trucker discouraged to see B.C.-bound Alberta travellers

Silver Creek man worries visits will put local efforts to flatten the curve at risk

Truck driver Rodney Dueck is used seeing westbound traffic with red and white licence plates during his trips to and from Alberta, but isn’t comfortable with what he’s seeing now.

Despite all the concerns and warnings around controlling the spread of COVID-19, the Silver Creek resident said he’s still seeing plenty of B.C.-bound Alberta traffic.

“I drive between B.C. and Alberta so I’m watching them go west… motorhomes, RVs, pickups loaded down with camping gear, U-haul trailers, travel trailers,” said Dueck, upset our Alberta neighbours are choosing this time to visit.

“When I can’t see my grandkids because I don’t want to infect anybody or I can’t see my parents because I don’t want to infect them, I can’t visit my neighbours across the fence, I can’t even go to church, and to see these hoards of Albertans flooding into B.C. really annoys me,” said Dueck.

Under normal circumstances Dueck said he values Albertans visiting the B.C., and the Shuswap, and supporting the local economy. But he worries about the impact those visiting now could have on efforts being made in both provinces to “flatten the curve.”

“Our hospital supplies are limited already, if they get sick, now we don’t have enough stuff for our own people let alone all the tourists, and the groceries on the shelves, well, there’s not enough of that either,” commented Dueck.

”Somebody had made a comment that they had talked to one Albertan and they said, ‘well, we can’t do anything in Alberta because it’s all shut down so we may as well go to our beach house in the Shuswap.’ Well, this is not a time for vacation.”

Read more: B.C. bans ‘shameful black market’ of food, medical supplies; limits buying quantities

Read more: Family of B.C. woman who died of COVID-19 makes plea for people to stay home

On Thursday, March 26, B.C. Public Safety Minister and Solicitor General Mike Farnworth announced new measures under the province’s state of emergency that went into effect on March 18. Among them, enabling municipal bylaw officers to support enforcement of the provincial health officer’s orders for business closures and gatherings, carrying fines of more than $25,000 or jail, to be determined by the courts under the authority of the public health act.

“This is not a drill,” commented B.C. Premier John Horgan. “The orders — they are not suggestions or good advice. They are the law.”

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

AlbertaCoronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Four air ambulance flights out of Terrace delayed or cancelled

Pandemic precautions caused nighttime closure of service station providing weather data to pilots

Skeena Resources, Tahltan prez excited by purchase of Eskay Creek

Skeena gets full control of mine, Barrick gets 12 per cent of Skeena and a one per cent royalty

Seabridge Gold starts drilling along proposed tunnel route north of Stewart

Twin tunnels will connect the KSM mine to its mill and tailings site

Mother grizzly bear with two cubs spotted on Gruchy’s Beach trail near Terrace

Conservation officers also warning public to stay away from Grizzlies on lower Kitimat River

Terrace conservation officers relocate Spirit bear

Bear roamed Kitsumkalum Valley north of Terrace for many years

Amber Alert for two Quebec girls cancelled after bodies found

Romy Carpentier, 6, Norah Carpentier, 11, and their father, Martin Carpentier, missing since Wednesday

B.C. man prepares to be first to receive double-hand transplant in Canada

After the surgery, transplant patients face a long recovery

Grocers appear before MPs to explain decision to cut pandemic pay

Executives from three of Canada’s largest grocery chains have defended their decision to end temporary wage increases

Bringing support to Indigenous students and communities, while fulfilling a dream

Mitacs is a nonprofit organization that operates research and training programs

Northern B.C. First Nations call for reversal of grizzly bear hunting ban

Growing grizzly populations have led to fewer ungulates and increased fear of attacks says Chad Day

RCMP ‘disappointed’ by talk that race a factor in quiet Rideau Hall arrest

Corey Hurren, who is from Manitoba, is facing 22 charges

NHL’s Canadian hubs offer little economic benefit, but morale boost is valuable: experts

Games are slated to start Aug. 1 with six Canadian teams qualifying for the 24-team resumption of play

‘Made in the Cowichan Valley’ coming to a wine bottle near you

Cowichan Valley has the honour of being the first sub-GI outside of the Okanagan

Most Read