Jeremy Cook, of Nanaimo, stands with a new decal to be featured on Westcan Bulk Transport truck trailers. The decals, unveiled in Coquitlam, B.C. on Oct. 25, are part of a Mothers Against Drunk Driving initiative. (Tracy Crawford/MADD)

Nanaimo crash survivor featured on MADD impaired driving prevention campaign

The decals will be featured on the back of Westcan Bulk Transport truck trailers

Mothers Against Drunk Driving has unveiled a new set of decals that are sure to reach the far corners of B.C., urging drivers to think twice before getting behind the wheel while impaired.

The decals feature a photo of Nanaimo resident Jeremy Cook, who was 15 years old when he was struck by a drunk driver while riding in another car in October 2013. Forty decals will be attached to Westcan Bulk Transport truck trailers and be driven all over the Canada, MADD said in a news release.

In total, the transport company has 240 similar decals on its trailers – each carrying a simple message: Report impaired drivers and prevent tragedies by calling 911.

From 2011 to 2018, an average of 57 people were killed in alcohol-related crashes annually in B.C., according to data from the province.

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Cook suffered life-altering injuries in the crash, including a brain injury, long-term damage to his eyes and a collapsed lung. He still suffers from daily migraines, has nightmares and post-traumatic stress disorder.

“No one should ever have to go through this,” Cook said. “I’m sharing my photo and my story so that people can better understand the consequences of impaired driving, and so that they’ll call police if they see a driver they think might be impaired.”

Cook is the seventh crash victim to be included in the campaign since it launched in 2012.

“Sharing the powerful stories of victims is a crucial way to educate the public about the toll of impaired driving, and emphasize the importance of always driving sober,” said Dawn Regan, MADD Chief Operating Officer.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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