(Black Press Media files)

Jobs move outwards from city core, public transit use rises: Stats Canada

The study found the number of commuters taking public transit from the suburbs rose by 15 per cent in Vancouver

The number of suburb dwellers taking public transit into the city core for work is on the rise, even as more jobs move outside the city core.

On Wednesday, Statistics Canada said it found that the number of workers commuting 25 kilometres or more grew by six per cent to 16.8 per cent between 1996 and 2016.

However, since 1996, the percentage of jobs located in the city core has shrunk. In Vancouver, 29 per cent of workers have jobs within the city core, compared to 32 per cent in 1996.

The mix of fewer jobs in the city core but an increase in workers commuting longer distances cancelled out most of a potential increase in Vancouverites commuting distance, which went up only 0.3 per cent to a median of 7.9 kilometres.

The study found the number of commuters taking public transit from the suburbs rose by 15 per cent in Vancouver. By 2016, 45 per cent of of those coming in from the suburbs used public transit.

But that’s still lower than in many other Canadian cities. In Toronto, 67 per cent of commuters took public transit in from the suburbs.

Within the city core, more people are taking active modes of transportation, like walking or biking. Vancouver saw the number increase from 17 per cent in 1996 to 39 per cent in 2016.

ALSO READ: Survey finds minimal progress in Canadian military’s fight against sexual misconduct

ALSO READ: Survey finds 15% of Canadian cannabis users with a valid licence drive within two hours of using


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

WATCH: Jessica Patrick’s cousin Jacquie Bowes speaks at the Jessica Patrick Memorial March

The march commemorated the one-year anniversary of the 18-year-old’s unsolved death

‘This is where the movement is going to start’: Jessica Patrick remembered at memorial march

The march commemorates the one-year anniversary of the 18-year-old’s unsolved death

Upper Skeena Rec Centre officially opens

Community room named in honour of Peter and Lynn Newbery

Jury makes five recommendations following coroner’s inquest into Smithers man’s 2015 death

The jury classified the death accidental with “external pressure to the head [and] neck” as the cause

First Nations given max compensation for Ottawa’s child-welfare discrimination

2016 ruling said feds didn’t give same funding for on-reserve kids as was given to off-reserve kids

VIDEO: Liberals make child care pledge, Greens unveil platform on Day 6 of campaign

Green party leader Elizabeth May unveils her party’s platform in Toronto

Canucks sign Brock Boeser to three-year, US$17.6-million deal

Young sniper will be in Vancouver Tuesday

B.C. forest industry looks to a high-technology future

Restructuring similar to Europe 15 years ago, executive says

RCMP conclude investigation into 2017 Elephant Hill wildfire

Files have been turned over to BC Prosecution Service

B.C. wants to be part of global resolution in opioid company bankruptcy claim

Government says settlement must include Canadian claims for devastation created by overdose crisis

B.C. ends ‘birth alerts’ in child welfare cases

‘Social service workers will no longer share information about expectant parents without consent’

U.S. student, killed in Bamfield bus crash, remembered as ‘kind, intelligent, talented’

John Geerdes, 18, was one of two UVic students killed in the crash on Friday night

Free Tesla 3 offered with purchase of Surrey townhome

Century Group’s offer for Viridian development runs through Oct. 31

B.C. communities urged to improve access for disabled people

One in four B.C. residents has disability, most want to work

Most Read