Inquest jury makes five recommendations into B.C. RCMP spokesman’s death

All five recommendations into Sgt. Pierre Lemaitre’s death involve mental health

Better mental health assessments and education top the list of jury recommendations following a three-day coroner’s inquest into the death of a prominent B.C. RCMP spokesman.

Sgt. Pierre Lemaitre took his own life on July 29, 2013, nearly a year after going on stress leave after the fallout from the death of Polish immigrant Robert Dziekanski at Vancouver International Airport in 2007.

Late Thursday, the jury made five recommendations, all aimed at the RCMP, such as securing funding to bring in mental health assessments along with mandatory physicals every three years, as well as mental health education and classes for all members of the RCMP.

The jury also recommended making classes available for family members during the initial hiring of their loved ones to provide an overview of potential mental health issues that can arise over their career.

The inquest heard testimonies from Lemaitre’s widow, Sheila, medical experts, fellow Mounties, as well as one of his supervisors, Chief Supt. Denis Boucher.

READ MORE: RCMP spokesman spiralled into rage, depression after Dziekanski case, inquest hears

Lemaitre, who lived in Abbotsford, had been the first RCMP spokesperson to speak to the media about Dziekanski’s Taser-linked death and how four RCMP officers had responded.

His statement was later thrown into doubt when a citizen-recorded video surfaced that showed the Mounties firing their Tasers five times, not twice, and Dziekanski to be much less aggressive than described by the RCMP. Lemaitre had tried to correct the misinformation, but his bosses refused.

The coroner’s inquest is not meant to find legal fault, but to prevent similar deaths.

– With files from Katya Slepian


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Smithers rail Teamsters settle in for strike

Ottawa urges CN and union to continue talks as 3,200 workers hit the picket lines

Houston homicide suspect remanded in custody

A Houston man accused of the second degree murder of Elija Dumont… Continue reading

Bulkley Valley Credit Union named Business of the Year

Awards gala sets new attendance record

Hazelton aces their way to gold at Grade 8 girls volleyball zones

Smithers schools grab silver and bronze at Prince Rupert Middle School tournament

William Griffin arrested in Houston homicide

RCMP have now arrested William Griffin, the man wanted in connection to… Continue reading

Bye bye Bei Bei: Giant panda born in U.S. zoo heads to China

Panda heads back to China as part of cooperative breeding program

Members of little people community applaud change to drop ‘midget’ term

‘It’s not about sensitivity,’ says Allan Redford, the president of the Little People of Canada

Little progress in preventing sudden infant deaths since last report: BC Coroner

Coroners panel studied 141 sleep-related sudden infant deaths between 2013 and 2018

B.C.’s ‘Dr. Frankenstein of guns’ back in jail yet again for trafficking in Glock parts

Bradley Michael Friesen has parole revoked for allegedly importing gun parts yet again

B.C. woman suing after laser hair removal leaves her with ‘severe’ burns, scarring

Nadeau felt ‘far more pain’ than usual during the treatment

$2.9 million judgment in B.C. blueberry farm sabotage lawsuit

The new owners saw most of their farm ruined just as they took possession

B.C. to more than double sales tax on vaping products

Tax up from 7 to 20 per cent, tobacco tax up two cents

29 B.C. students in Hong Kong amid tense protests, university siege

Eight UVic and 21 UBC students still in Hong Kong

‘Midget’ no more: Sweeping division name changes coming to minor hockey in Canada

Alpha-numeric division names will be used for the 2020-2021 season and beyond

Most Read