FortisBC has adapted its BC-based school programming to support those learning from home. (FortisBC)

FortisBC program to help students learn about energy from home

Lessons challenge students to consider social, ethical, environmental implications of energy use

FortisBC has adapted its B.C. based school programming to support those learning from home.

Now, parents and teachers have 30 new ways they can teach students about energy. This new programming support students in Grades 1 to 10.

FortisBC’s Energy Leaders school program is an online platform that allows teachers to downtown complete lesson modules. Originally designed for in-class learning, there are now close to 30 modules available for home learning environments with more to be released next week. They can be easily downloaded for free.

READ MORE: Okanagan’s flood story opens new preparedness chapter

According to FortisBC, the lessons are designed by local teachers and connect with B.C.’s inquiry-based curriculum across grade levels to teach energy concepts such as the importance of energy in the world, where it comes from, how it’s used in B.C. and why it’s important to use it safely and responsibly.

“As both a parent and partner of a teacher, I have firsthand experience on how challenging it can be to find local materials that support learning at home,” said Danielle Wensink, FortisBC’s director of conservation and energy management.

“Because the Energy Leaders modules are already in line with B.C.’s curriculum, this was an ideal way for us to support parents and educators who are faced with this same challenge.”

The new distance learning materials connect to a variety of kindergarten to Grade 10 subjects including science, social studies and English, as well will look at some of the platform’s most popular modules like Climate change: Earth and its climate. Each module contains a complete set of teaching materials including a lesson plan, slides and handouts that invite students to generate and share ideas, and transfer and apply learning to new situations.

The lessons challenge students to consider the social, ethical and environmental implications of energy use.

For younger grades, caregivers can download a colouring and activity book. Designed for kindergarten and Grade 1, it introduces students to where energy comes from and the actions they can take to conserve energy with fun activities and games, like ‘Easy ways to conserve energy at home’ and the ‘Shortest Shower game’.

Parents and educators can access the modules, available for free download, without a password, from energyleaders.ca/distancelearning.

READ MORE: Problem solving a pandemic: a B.C. man on working for Doctors Without Borders in Pakistan

READ MORE: Cycling advocates say a different mindset is needed for people taking it up

@PentictonNews
editor@pentictonwesternnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Town grants Chamber $20K

Chamber estimates up to $65K in lost revenue, turns to council for help

COVID-19 highlights lack of connectivity in First Nations communities

Many don’t have access required to utilize online platforms, says First Nations Technology Council

Salmon closures announced for Skeena and Nass watersheds

DFO notice expands on May 21 chinook ban throughout Skeena watershed

New Salt Boutique the realization of a vision for owner Caroline Marko

Marko combines the rough and the soft in a minimalist, clean airy space

Coastal GasLink pipeline work ramps up

With spring thaw ending, workers start to arrive for summer season

VIDEO: Injured bald eagle rescued in B.C. First Nations community

Bird suspected injured in fight, whisked off to Coquitlam rehab

Toronto Raptors’ Ujiri says conversations about racism can no longer be avoided

Thousands have protested Floyd’s death and repeated police killings of black men across the United States

‘I’m afraid’: Witnesses of wolf attack on senior near Prince Rupert worried about safety

Frank Russ shows where the unprovoked wolf attacked his father

Protesters prepare to rally against racism in front of Vancouver Art Gallery

Rally is in response to the deaths of black Americans and a Toronto woman

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

Protesters rally against anti-black, Indigenous racism in Toronto

Police estimated the crowd to be between 3,500 and 4,000 and said there was no violence

Feds earmark $1.5M to support recovery of B.C., Indigenous tourism

B.C. money will be split between Vancouver Island and Indigenous tourism

‘We’re sick of it’: Anger over police killings shatters U.S.

Tens of thousands marched to protest the death of George Floyd

Most Read