Eighth annual Moose Hide Campaign marches through Victoria

This year’s Moose Hide Campaign kicked off a new education initiative aimed at students K-12 to help end violence against women and children. (Kendra Crighton/News Staff)
This year’s Moose Hide Campaign kicked off a new education initiative aimed at students K-12 to help end violence against women and children. (Kendra Crighton/News Staff)

Drums could be heard through downtown Victoria Wednesday, marking the beginning of the Walk to End Violence, part of the eighth annual Moose Hide Campaign.

This year marked the beginning of the Moose Hide Learning Journey, a new education initiative aimed at kindergarten to Grade 12 students as part of its drive to end violence against women and children.

RELATED: Millionth Moose Hide pin awarded after Campaign march to B.C. legislature

The walk ended at the steps of B.C.’s Parliament Buildings with large crowds gathering despite the cold and snowy weather.

“All of us have a responsibility to stand up, raise our voice and say no to gender-based violence,” said Premier John Horgan in a statement. “By expanding its reach to include children and youth, the Moose Hide Campaign is helping young people lead the way as we work together to build a future free from violence and fear.”

The day-long event started early Wednesday with a daybreak ceremony, followed by keynote addresses at the Victoria Conference Centre and a march to the B.C. Legislature.

RELATED: Moose Hide message to men keeps growing

The campaign encourages students to explore values and perspectives that honour and respect women and children through an online platform that has been piloted in a number of schools throughout the province.

The online platform provides lessons, videos, and other resources for students and teachers to access.

“Engaging young people through the Moose Hide Campaign education platform is a critically important part of our vision to end violence against women and children,” said Paul Lacerte, co-founder of the Moose Hide Campaign. “Investing in young people through the education system will result in the kind of inter-generational healing that we are all seeking.”

The new initiative is funded by a portion of the $2 million provided in 2018 by the provincial government to support the campaign’s work.


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