‘Dr. Lipjob’ avoids jail, gets 30-day suspended sentence

She will have to serve the 30 days in prison if she commits a breach during her two-year’s probation

Dr. Lipjob has once again wandered into the maw of controversy.

Rajdeep Kaur Khakh, of Abbotsford, was handed a 30-day suspended sentence in B.C. Supreme Court on Jan. 18 and ordered to pay a $5,000 fine following an admission she was in civil contempt of a March 2018 consent order, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia revealed Wednesday.

She will have to serve the 30 days in prison if she commits a breach during her two-years’ probation.

Khakh, who went by the moniker “Dr. Lipjob” on social media, had been ordered to stop unlawfully practising medicine after the college secured a desist order against her in court.

The college started its investigation on March 25, 2015 after learning Khakh was scheduled to perform “injectables” at a spa in Delta. The college ordered her to not offer such treatments and to stop using the title “Dr.”

On July 15, 2016, a representative of the college presented Khakh with a letter at a spa in Surrey, demanding that she “immediately cease engaging in the unauthorized practise of medicine and unauthorized use of reserved titles,” according to a media release from the college.

On June 14, 2017, the college was told that Khakh, operating under the names “Dr. Rajji” and “Dr. LipJob,” had been referring to herself as a physician and doing injectable procedures at a hair salon in Surrey. In response, between June and August of that year the college hired a security company to conduct an undercover investigation involving social media and a hidden camera, and the company found empty boxes of Abotulinum toxin A and dermal fillers, one with an expiry date of Oct. 10, 2016.

Then, on Oct. 24, 2017 a woman contacted the college claiming she received dermal filler treatment at her residence by Khakh on Oct. 6, 2017.

On March 22, 2018, Khakh agreed to a consent order obtained by the college, in B.C. Supreme Court, and to pay $25,000 in the form of a costs settlement. On July 4, 2018, the college learned Khakh had administered dermal fillers “numerous times” on July 3, 2018, in contravention of the consent order and on Nov. 7, 2018 the college filed a petition with the court to have Khakh sent to prison and/or fined for contempt.

Khakh had been ordered not to hold herself out “as being qualified, able or willing to diagnose when Botox or other dermal filler might be indicated; diagnosing or offering to diagnose when Botox or other dermal fillers might be indicated; using the title ‘doctor,’ ‘physician,’ ‘surgeon’ and ‘medical practitioner,’ and from recovering any fee or remuneration in that respect.”

The college licenses and regulates all B.C. physicians and surgeons with the aim of protecting the public by “establishing, monitoring and enforcing high standards of qualification and ethical practice across the province.”



tom.zytaruk@surreynowleader.com

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