A landslide that knocked out power and shut the highway east of Queen Charlotte in October. (Black Press files)

Disaster assistance funding now available for north coast flooding victims

Applications must be submitted to Emergency Management BC by Feb. 15.

Provincial financial assistance is now available to eligible B.C. residents who may have been impacted by the flooding that occurred from Oct. 23 to 27 along the northern coast.

In a statement Saturday, the province said claims through the Distaster Finance Assistance fund will cover 80 per cent of the total eligible damage between $1,000 and $300,000.

Applications must be submitted to Emergency Management BC by Feb. 15.

In October, flood warnings were issued due to heavy rain caused by an intense frontal system.

READ MORE: Warnings about flooding, water pooling along Nisga’a Hwy and Hwys 16 and 37

READ MORE: Heavy rainfall affects roads, water in Queen Charlotte and Skidegate

The River Forecast Centre reported more than 100 mm in rainfall in some areas of the region, including Terrace and Kitimat, Haida Gwaii and the Nas to Stewart area – leading to evacuations in New Remo.

The following areas eligible for damage claims are:

  • Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine (electoral areas C and E)
  • Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako (electoral area A)
  • Central Coast Regional District
  • Village of Queen Charlotte
  • City of Terrace
  • Village of Telkwa

Claims to be approved by Emergency Management BC

While claims are open to home owners, renters, business owners and even charitable organizations, there are some restrictions.

For business owners and farms applying for assistance funds, evidence will need to prove the claim is connected to their primary source of income.

Charitable organizations must provide a benefit of service to the community at large.

Meanwhile, seasonal or recreational properties, hot tubs, patios, pools, garden tools, landscaping and luxury items such as jewelry, fur coats and collectibles are not eligible for assistance. Recreational items – such as bicycles – will also be rejected.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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