Canada’s Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien waits to appear before The International Grand Committee on Big Data, Privacy and Democracy in Ottawa, Tuesday, May 28, 2019. The federal privacy commissioner says U.S. firm Clearview AI will stop offering its facial-recognition services in Canada in response to an investigation by the commissioner and three provincial counterparts. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Clearview AI to end facial-recognition services in Canada: privacy commissioner

Office says it will complete a related investigation focusing on RCMP use of Clearview AI’s facial-recognition technology

The federal privacy commissioner says U.S. firm Clearview AI will stop offering its facial-recognition services in Canada in response to an investigation by the commissioner and three provincial counterparts.

The office of privacy watchdog Daniel Therrien says the move includes the indefinite suspension of Clearview AI’s contract with the RCMP, its last remaining client in Canada.

Clearview AI’s technology allows for the collection of huge numbers of images from various sources that can help police forces, financial institutions and other clients identify people.

The joint investigation of Clearview by privacy protection authorities for Canada, Alberta, British Columbia and Quebec remains open.

Therrien’s office says the authorities still plan to issue findings given the importance of the issue for the privacy rights of Canadians.

The investigation followed media reports that raised questions and concerns about whether the company is collecting and using personal information without consent.

One issue under investigation is the deletion of the personal information of Canadians that Clearview has already collected, Therrien’s office said Monday.

“The privacy authorities appreciate Clearview AI’s co-operation to date on the ongoing investigation, and look to the company’s continued co-operation as it is brought to conclusion.”

In addition, Therrien’s office says it will complete a related investigation focusing on RCMP use of Clearview AI’s facial-recognition technology.

READ MORE: Four Canadian privacy watchdogs launch probe into Tim Hortons app

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

privacy

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Coastal GasLink breaks ground on meter station in Kitimat

Meter station marks final point on pipeline that stretches from Northeast B.C.

Mayoral nominations open Sept. 1

Deputy Mayor Gladys Atrill confirms she will be running for the top job

Brucejack mine fatality identified

Patrick Critch was from Newfoundland

Friendship Centre optimistic MMIWG mural will be painted this year

Following trauma-informed healing workshops, project is now in the design phase

Lawsuit launched after Florida child handcuffed, booked and briefly jailed

Suit alleges “deliberate indifference” to what should have been handled as a behavioural issue

Russia approves vaccine, Putin hopes to begin mass production

Critic calls decision to proceed without thorough testing ‘dangerous and grossly immoral’

Man, 54, charged in connection with fatal attack of Red Deer doctor

Doctor was killed in his walk-in clinic on Monday

Doctor slain in Alberta medical clinic was devoted father, husband

Red Deer doctors on edge after attack on colleague who had two young daughters

Royal B.C. Museum wants B.C.’s COVID-19 nature observations

COVID-19 Collecting For Our Time: ongoing project cataloguing province’s pandemic experience

Feds offer ‘life preserver’ funds to BC Ferries as pandemic sinks revenue

For every dollar the province spends the federal government will match

Bad behaviour at B.C. restaurants ignites campaign calling for respect

“If you can’t follow the rules, then stay home,” says BC Restaurant and Foodservices Association

Over half of Americans oppose Trump tariff on Canadian aluminum: survey

The survey was conducted Aug. 7 to 9 among 1,513 Canadians and 1,003 Americans

Most Read