Rath’s Many Lives on display

Rath is giving an artist’s talk at the gallery on Nov. 9 at 6 p.m. on his paintings and sculptures.

Any trip to the Smithers Art Gallery is sure to be a satisfying venture. There is always something a bit different to view that makes one appreciate the culture of creativity that exists in such a small, rural community.

The display currently on view is no exception. In fact, it goes even deeper to show how we have something special here in our little spot nestled in the northern mountains.

Perry Rath is not only an accomplished artist, he takes that next step that many in the creative realm assume we should all take. He teaches his art to the students at Smithers Secondary.

For his first local show in around five years, Rath brings a very broad range of expressive styles and techniques. For example, some of the works on display were developed out of recycled materials to create pieces of artwork.

Rath has had some of his works on display at a wide variety of events all across the world. While some artists head to larger communities to do their thing, Rath feels that he is better off doing it here in what might be seen as an exotic locale by those in faraway places like New York or Moscow.

His works immediately seem familiar. You might get the feeling that you’ve seen some of those pieces before but you just can’t place it. Maybe it was the cover art for an Alex Cuba album, among others.

Works on display include paintings in a variety of forms, sculptures made from a number of surprising substances.

Viewing some of the paintings from a few steps back is pleasing but some of the works pull you in for a closer examination. That look can be entrancing as you realize the details of what you are really looking at.

The Perry Rath Many Lives exhibit can be seen until Nov. 22.

Rath is giving an artist’s talk at the gallery on Nov. 9 at 6 p.m.

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One has to look closely in order to discern what is behind a first impression of some of Rath’s works. That closer look will reveal much more than just texture and colour. Tom Best photos

Some of Rath’s works include attempts to be less wasteful with a variety of substances. Those attempts are surprisingly engaging.

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