The concert was not just an exhibition of new songs and music. Perry entertained the sold out house with tales of life here on the Northwest both humorous and dramatic. Tom Best photo

Mark Perry’s ‘northwesty’ perspective is Right Here

“It’s about the larger area here and the life in it,” says Bulkley Valley favourite Mark Perry.

The Smithers area is rife with great performers, and while some of them like Alex Cuba have gathered an international audience, perhaps the most popular of all among the locals is home town artist Mark Perry.

His 11th album release Right Here is a very comfortable album full of songs that local inhabitants can all relate to.

Songs like Go Cubs Go make us all think about the history of the area and the activity that makes it so special. Others such as Mountain Bluebird make us think of the little things that help us get through the long winters and still smile with the appearance of a little feathered friend.

Perry loves the area and his concert was much more than a chance to hear him sing live.

At times, he was like a stand-up comedian and there were times he was more like a historian helping us remember some forgotten part of life in the area.

At the outset of the concert, he announced that he would be donating $5 of each CD sold to diabetes research.

“The subject matter of the album is ‘northwesty.’ It’s about the larger area here and the life in it,” he said.

It was an entirely entertaining evening that was over too soon.

The CD will help bring back some of the wonderful feeling Perry brought out at the concert.

More show dates during his album release concert are available at markperry.ca.

sports@interior-news.com

 

Mark Perry proudly wears his Alex Cuba shirt at the concert for the release of his eleventh album Right Here. (Tom Best photo)

Perry describes his music as “northwesty.” It describes and relishes the land and the life here in this part of the country. (Tom Best photo)

Perry was at ease in his singing and relaxed like he was talking to a neighbor in between songs. (Tom Best photo)

Perry was lavish in his praise for his backup musicians. Rear: Mark Thibault (pedal steel) Ian Holmstead (bass guitar) Rachelle Van Zanten (accordion) Kiri Daust (violin). Front: Richard Jenne (percussion), Mark Perry. (Tom Best photo)

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