this is a good one, 2021 photograph by Edzudzah (Janell Morin)

this is a good one, 2021 photograph by Edzudzah (Janell Morin)

A story of a Tāhłtān Matriarch and Tāhłtān art at the art gallery

her name is Edz┼źdzah: Peter Morin and Janell Morin showing until Oct. 6

A new exhibit at the Smithers Art Gallery is dedicated to a mother and son’s contributions to Tahłtan Nation culture.

The show is called ‘her name is Edzudzah: Peter Morin and Janell Morin.’

Janell Morin is a Crow Clan Matriarch of the Tahltan Nation. Janell loves her Tahltan culture and continues to be an active contributor to Tahltan Cultural life/ways. She was trained in the culture by her Tahltan Elders. This was something she prioritized in her home and in her life. At one point in her over 40-year career, she was the sole proprietor of JM Janitorial

Janell is the mother of four children – Robert, Cathleen, Nalaine and Peter. She met the love of her life Pierre Morin in Cassiar B.C. over 50 years ago, and they continue to walk together in this life. Didene K’eh Onye Edzudzah (her name is Edzudzah).

Peter Morin is a Crow Clan member of the Tahltan Nation. He inherits these rights, responsibilities, and accountabilities from his mother Janell Morin. For over 20 years, Peter has worked as a performance artist, writer, thinker, curator, educator. This creative work has consistently been informed and shaped by the incredible efforts of his mom, Janell Morin. Didene K’eh EzekTah (his name is EzekTah). He was gifted this name by his Grandmother Dinah Creyke. Peter Morin works at OCADU, but his most important jobs are being a son, a brother, a cousin, an uncle, and a community member.

“Over the past 20 years, my artistic work has prioritized Tahltan ways of being as I’ve learned them from our mom,” wrote Peter Morin. “This exhibition is my way of acknowledging her deep and important contributions to my practice and thinking. This exhibition is also a story about how Tahltan aesthetics and cultural power live inside all aspects of daily living.”

The exhibition is on until Oct. 6.

Gallery hours are: Tuesday to Friday 12 – 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

 

Patrons gather for artist reception on opening night of her name is Edzūdzah, a Tahltan exhbilition at the Smithers Art Gallery. (Contributed photo)

Patrons gather for artist reception on opening night of her name is Edzūdzah, a Tahltan exhbilition at the Smithers Art Gallery. (Contributed photo)

a portrait of the Artist’s Mother as a young bingo player, 2003 Oil painting on canvas first shown at Urban Shaman, Anishinabe (Ojibway), Ininew (Cree), Oji-Cree, Dene, and Dakota, and is the Birthplace of the Métis Nation and the heart of the Métis Nation Homeland (Winnipeg)

a portrait of the Artist’s Mother as a young bingo player, 2003 Oil painting on canvas first shown at Urban Shaman, Anishinabe (Ojibway), Ininew (Cree), Oji-Cree, Dene, and Dakota, and is the Birthplace of the Métis Nation and the heart of the Métis Nation Homeland (Winnipeg)