New trout regulations for Skeena region

B.C. changes the rules for trout retention in the northwest.

Beginning April 1 trout and char will be off-limits for anyone wishing to bring one home following recent amendments to fishing regulations by the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.

After extensive input from communities and multiple stakeholders, the ministry decided that an expected increase in access to streams and rivers in the northwest would put the fish at risk.

However, between July 1 and October 31 a person will be allowed to keep one trout of more than 30 centimetres in length per day.

For the remaining eight months trout fishing in the Skeena area, or Region 6, is now strictly catch-and-release.

“It is in the interests of conservation and maintenance of recreational value to reduce harvest quotas until a better assessment of risk can be made,” the ministry said.

“The regulation affects only the retention of trout and char in streams, and does not change the opportunity to angle for these species in streams, or to harvest salmon in streams or wild and stocked trout and char in lakes.”

A comprehensive study regarding the exact population of char and trout in Region 6 has not been done by the ministry in part because the area stretches from south of Kitimat east of Burns Lake and north to the Yukon border.

“Assessment of stream trout and char populations is particularly challenging, due to the complexity of their life cycles and population structure, and large number of stream systems in the region which support these species,” said the ministry.

This proactive move will keep the population of trout and char healthy despite changes in the region.

“Habitat disruption is part of the concern, including increasing road access and climate change,” according to the ministry.

“The ministry makes regulations based on all factors when managing for conservation reasons.

“Non-retention for November 1 through June 30 will help protect trout during a more vulnerable part of their life cycle.”

If found poaching or having too many fish an initial fine of $100 will be levied and $50 for each fish over the daily quota up to $1000.

The regular fishing licence requirement remains the same throughout B.C.

First Nations food harvesting practices are not affected by the regulation  change.

“First Nations right to harvest for food, social and ceremonial purposes are not affected,” the ministry said.

“This particular regulation was actively presented to the fisheries representatives of six First Nations in the region.”

The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations recommends local residents to report any violations of the Fisheries Act through the Report All Poachers and Polluters (RAPP) hotline at 1-877-952-RAPP (7277).

For more information visit http://www.gov.bc.ca/for/.

 

Just Posted

Coastal GasLink gets interim injunction against Unist’ot’en

The LNG pipeline company can start work Monday with enforcement approved by court.

They’re engaged!

Birthday party turns into engagement party for Doug and Matilda

Hampers a chance to help in the Christmas spirit

SCSA sends around 350-400 hampers to the area from Witset to Telkwa.

Volunteers create Christmas magic at Santa’s Breakfast

PHOTOS: For the past 19 years, a local event helped remind us that Christmas is a time of giving.

Most intervenor requests in crucial natural gas pipeline case rejected

At stake is whether gas pipeline to LNG Canada plant should fall under federal jurisdiction

VIDEO: Royals reveal the images on their Christmas cards

Prince William and his wife Kate are shown outside in casual clothes, their three young children in tow

ICBC to apply for 6.3% hike to basic insurance rates

Crown Corporation said it will be submitting its next basic rate application to the British Columbia Utilities Commission Friday

Media, robotics, Indigenous studies coming to B.C. Grade 12 classrooms in 2019-20

Provincial tests are also being changed for students in Grade 10 to 12, the Education Ministry said

Stranded B.C. trucker writes final wishes before being rescued 3 days later

‘I was just praying someone would come along’

Canfor Corp. extending temporary curtailment of sawmills in B.C.; cutting hours

Vancouver-based company says the decision is due to declining lumber prices, high log costs and log supply constraints

Canada’s prospective world junior team members await final roster decisions

Thirty-four players were invited to the national junior selection camp

Family searching for B.C. professor last seen at Colombian salsa club

Ramazan Gencay, a professor in economics at Simon Fraser University, was last seen in Medellin

Rash of bomb threats a learning opportunity for response capacity, Goodale

Thursday’s wave of bomb threats swept across communities on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border

Mike Duffy can’t sue Senate over suspension without pay, judge rules

Duffy’s lawsuit sought more than $7.8 million from the upper chamber

Most Read