Hip hop artists Testament

Hip hop spreads the rhyme

Hip hop artists busted some rhymes at the Old Church to support local First Nations groups in their fight against resource development.

They came to bust some rhymes and in the process to support First Nations groups in their fight against resource development.

“We’ve been doing hip hop for a long time and have been involved in activism,” Testament of Test Their Logik, from Toronto, said.

“Social and environmental issues are a main focus.”

Mel Bazil, program coordinator with the Circle of Supports Program at the Dze L K’ant Friendship Centre Society referred to Test Their Logik and Savage Family as allies of the Unist’ot’en camp and Lhe Lin Liyin organization.

“Tonight is about sharing information,” Bazil said as his hand waved towards a table covered with pamphlets and books.

“It’s also about sharing music and celebrating the stance against unwanted pipelines and unwanted mining.”

Test Their Logic is currently on a cross-Canada tour, spreading the word about environmental issues such as the several pipeline projects proposed for northwestern B.C.

Hip hop has been a part of Testament’s life since he was a child, and  along the way he learned about social and environmental issues and decided to blend the two when he first took the stage as a hip hop artist.

“I thought I would put two and two together and make those connections in my daily life,” Testament said.

“I’m trying to shift the voice of hip hop away from horizontal violence, gang culture, drugs and sexism.

“We have so much power in hip hop to use our voices for good.

“The lyric sheet for hip hop is long, you have so many words, you should be making people think about things from a different perspective.”

Testament described the current generation of youth as the tipping generation, referring to the many aspects of their future being decided right now, especially with respect to environmental damage.

“It’s their future, they need to take ownership and fight for the future they want to see.

“A lot of people want to get rich by putting pipelines through here.

“Take the long view, take control of the future because you are the future.”

 

Just Posted

Fires still burning near Telegraph Creek

BC Wildfire Service assures residents of a proactive plan heading into wildfire season

Northwest entrepreneurs pitch their plans for cash prizes

ThriveNorth announces 12 finalists in this year’s business challenge

CT scanner expected to be up and running by end of June

When tragedy strikes and internal injuries are expected, 30 minutes can make all the difference

Gas prices steady in Smithers

Industry analyst says local retailers not making money, pain yet to come

Verdict scheduled in Giesbrecht murder trial

B.C. Supreme Court justice will render his decision May 24

VIDEO: Alberta man creates world’s biggest caricature

Dean Foster is trying to break the world record for a radio show contest

B.C. RCMP receive application for Police Cat Services

RCMP announced the launch of the Police Cat Services unit as an April fools joke

Kirkland Signature veggie burgers recalled due to possible metal fragments

Recalled products came in 1.7 kg packages with a best before date of Apr. 23, 2019

Chaos at the ferry terminal for people heading from Vancouver to the Island

Easter crowds create backlog at Tsawwassen ferry terminal

Parents of 13 who tortured children get life after hearing victims

One of their daughters fled their home and pleaded for help to a 911 operator

Flooding, climate change force Quebecers to rethink relationship with water

Compensation for victims of recurring floods limit to 50% of a home’s value, or a maximum of $100,000

Storms blast South, where tornadoes threaten several states

9.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia at a moderate risk of severe weather

Private cargo ship brings Easter feast to the space station

There are three Americans two Russians and one Canadian living on the space station

Notre Dame rector: “Computer glitch” possible fire culprit

The fire burned through the lattice of oak beams supporting the monument’s vaulted stone ceiling

Most Read