Exploring the wonders of the little gem called eggs

Here I go again trying to tell you I know stuff about nutrition. My interest this week was piqued when I talked to a friend who told me that eating an egg-white omelette was the way to go for good health.

Here I go again trying to tell you I know stuff about nutrition. My interest this week was piqued when I talked to a friend who told me that eating an egg-white omelette was the way to go for good health.

I can tell you as an older person with only one eye I was fascinated to find out that a couple eggs here and there has lutein in it. Just what a person needs to help hold off macular degeneration as well as the formation of cataracts.

A study put out by the Harvard School of Public Health concluded that there was little connection to eating eggs and heart disease. In fact they said that eggs might help prevent blood clots and strokes.

Eggs also contain lots of choline which I gather helps the function of our brains. Keeping my eyesight and having a functioning brain makes me happy with my over-easy eggs in the morning.

Here’s another interesting study about eggs; it could be that as many as six eggs a week lowered the risk of breast cancer by 44 per cent.

Eggs do contain dietary cholesterol which is not the kind you already produce in your body. Cholesterol is not fat but a fat-like substance that blocks our arteries.

I know some health care providers will tell you I am talking through my hat. Could be, but still I am not about to forsake this little gem called eggs.

From time-to-time I like to make a big frittata. It can be frozen in chunks to have when you feel the urge. Here is a recipe I use often. It is called Confetti Frittata.

You will need 1/4 lbs of bulk sausage, 1/4 cup diced green pepper, 1/4 cup diced red pepper, 1/4 cup diced red onion, 1/4 cup of grated cheese of some sort, spices you like, and of course eight eggs. Brown crumbled sausage, cook veggies and sausage until done. Spread mixture over bottom of pan. Whisk your eggs with the spices and cheese and spread over the vegetables and sausage. Put the burner on low, cover and cook until mostly set. Now put the thing under the broiler until hot and bubbly.

This recipe comes from a great book titled 500 Low-Carb Recipes by Dana Carpender. A good book for all of us.

Need I say it again? Here I go: talk to your health care provider and research about eggs. It’s your body and health that depends on our own personal knowledge.

So scramble and poach away and call 250-846-5095 when you have time. An e-mail is always welcome when it comes to mallory@bulkley.net.