Antawn Wagner’s self portrait (right) was part of the Digital Photo Club exhibition last week at the Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition. A book with all student photos from the final ‘story-line’ assignment is available at the Hazelton public library.

Antawn Wagner’s self portrait (right) was part of the Digital Photo Club exhibition last week at the Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition. A book with all student photos from the final ‘story-line’ assignment is available at the Hazelton public library.

Digital Art Club tells stories through photo

For the second year, the Digital Story Club held a gala event to showcase part of their individual story told through photographs.

For the second year, the Digital Story Club held a gala event to showcase part of their individual story told through photographs.

Keegan Schopfer, Hazelton District Public Library intern, has been the driving force behind the event and he is very pleased with both the quality of photos and the support shown from the community last Thursday at the  event.

There were only eight spots available for children between ages 10 and 14, who only needed to have an interest in photography to join in.

“It was really amazing to see the perspectives they came up with,” Schopfer said.

“It’s a bit surprising ow creative they can be having only a bit of experience with photography.”

The Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition provided the space for the photos to be displayed and Schopfer was delighted to see close to 30 people in attendance.

The program was created by Schopfer while working at the library and born of his personal interest in photography.

Spots filled up within a week after word was out about the photo club.

Six instructional meetings were led by Schopfer, where students were shown the elements of photography.

“Every week we’d get together for about an hour and a half,” Schopfer said.

“Each week had its own theme, like, composition, subject matter or leading lines.”

Club members, at the end of each class, were asked to capture at least two images based on the last tutorial.

Composition required strong shapes in the photo, whereas, subject matter usually involves a person or animal as the focus of the shot.

Schopfer made sure everyone was given the chance to share what they thought.

“We had critique sessions,” Schopfer said.

“Where one student would show their pictures, but would have to listen to what class members thought of their work first.”

This process took a little while to get going.

“At first the kids were shy and didn’t really have much to say,” Schopfer said.

“But once they had a few sessions behind them they were all keen to both show their pictures and able to offer each other helpful suggestions to each other.”

This year’s club included Antawn Wagner, Jade Watson, Krystian Howard, Honor Watson, Salome Huber, Galadrielle Burgess and Jadah Grimm-O’Neill.

One student backed out of the club shortly before the exhibition.

The sixth session ended with students given the assignment of taking photos that would tell viewers a bit about themselves.

“They were asked to tell a story in ten images or less,” Schopfer said.

The compiled photos were made into a book available for viewing at the Hazelton public library.

Funding for this years’ club was funded by Industry Canada through the Community Access Program, which also is the source of funding for Schopfer’s internship.

“Part of my job as an intern is to promote and assist people with technology,” he said.

“This class was designed to help kids become more familiar with digital cameras.”

Each student receives a certificate of completion and a copy of the book they helped create.

Another class may be happening next month.

Call the library at 250-842-5961 for info.