Scott Allen of Coastal GasLink speaks at the Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon May 16 at Pioneer Place. (Thom Barker photo)

Coastal GasLink introduces pipeline construction subcontractor

Italy’s Bonatti Group to build sections 6 and 7 of pipeline from Burns Lake to Hazelton

Last week, Coastal GasLink introduced the subcontractor that will be doing the construction on sections 6 and 7 of the company’s 670 km pipeline to local business leaders at the Smithers District Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon.

Pacific Atlantic Pipeline Construction (PAPC) is a Canadian subsidiary of Bonatti Group, an oil and gas general contractor based in Italy. The company will be building the two sections of the pipeline that run approximately 165 kilometres from south of Burns Lake to south of Hazelton.

“We’re excited about our industry,” said Dave Hermanson, a PAPC pipeline estimator and planner from Calgary. “We do everything right in Canada, we don’t cut corners, we do things right and we’re very proud of our pipeline industry in spite of the opposition sometimes we get.”

Hermanson said during construction, the company will employ between 700 and 1,000 people based out of two camps, one around 20 km south of Burns Lake and the second, the Huckleberry camp near Houston.

The pipeline project itself has garnered international attention due to protests by the Unist’ot’en (Dark House) of the Wet’suwet’en and their supporters.

READ MORE: Coastal GasLink prepares sites of construction work camps

Scott Allen, who is responsible for community and Indigenous engagement for Coastal GasLink on the western part of the project, addressed that issue during his presentation on the overall project.

“I’m not going to dance around that,” he said. “On January 1st things picked up in a big way on construction, it was very prominent in the news, especially in this community, of course, was issues around the Morice River bridge.

“They’re not events we wanted to come to pass. We’ve continued to be very open in our dialogue with hereditary chiefs in that area, who don’t support the project, we’re aware of that, but we feel that we have good support broadly. We’re never going to get a 100 per cent, we respect that.”

He did point out, however, that CGL has legal agreements with all of the 20 elected chiefs and councils along the pipeline’s route.

READ MORE: Likhts’amisyu clan vows to build new blockade

Of course, the audience at the chamber luncheon at Pioneer Place May 16 was a friendly one and Allen had an invitation for the business people gathered there.

“I think there’s about 60 categories of things that typically a pipeline project needs by way of subcontracts,” he said. “Some of them are specialized to the pipeline industry… but there are some more general services that you would find here locally without question, especially some of the construction services.”

Allen encouraged Smithers and area businesses to register with Coastal GasLink’s vendor directory.

“We’re using that directory to inform how we’re distributing opportunities,” he said.

PAPC is also required to use local subcontractors as part of the bidding process.

“Our prime contractors have what we call Indigenous and local participation plans,” Allen said.

Hermanson also spoke about the economic impact in the area.

“We’re already seeing it,” he said. “I couldn’t get a flight in here, I had to fly into Terrace and then I had to rent a car and fly out of Prince George and drop the car there, just because I couldn’t get in here.”

Hermanson listed everything from accommodations to rental vehicles and equipment to wood products, as well as a litany of sundry items from food to first aid kits to work gloves as opportunities for local business.

“It’s a huge thing and this is a lot of what the $400 million that Scott referred to is going to be taken up with, local and local Indigenous [contracts],” he said.

READ MORE: Smithers resident’s challenge to Coastal Gaslink heard by NEB

Allen also gave an update on the other conflict the company is currently facing, a challenge by Smithers resident Michael Sawyer to the National Energy Board (NEB) on constitutional grounds that B.C. did not have jurisdiction to approve the project. The NEB heard oral arguments May 2 and 3 in Calgary.

“Candidly, now we wait, we wait for the NEB to make their decision,” he said. “We are confident we have the facts on our side.”



editor@interior-news.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Dr. Bonnie Henry given a Gitxsan name: ‘one who is calm among us’

The provincial health officer was honoured in a May 22 ceremony at elementary school in Hazelton

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Smithers woman awarded $55K in RCMP excessive force suit

Irene Joseph alleged false arrest and assault and battery related to a 2014 incident in Smithers

Cannabis shop soon to open in Witset

Indigenous Bloom shop to be followed by cannabis cultivation facility in closed down sawmill

Celebrations continue for Tsilhqot’in Nation after court victory against Taskeo Mines Ltd.

Supreme Court of Canada upholds 2014 decision rejecting New Prosperity mine on May 14, 2020

B.C. records no new COVID-19 deaths for the first time in weeks

Good news comes despite 11 new test-positive cases in B.C. in the past 24 hours

BC Corrections to expand list of eligible offenders for early release during pandemic

Non-violent offenders are being considered for early release through risk assessment process

Fraser Valley driver featured on ‘Highway Thru Hell’ TV show dies

Monkhouse died Sunday night of a heartattack, Jamie Davis towing confirmed

B.C. visitor centres get help with COVID-19 prevention measures

Destination B.C. gearing up for local, in-province tourism

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

36 soldiers test positive for COVID-19 after working in Ontario, Quebec care homes

Nearly 1,700 military members are working in long-term care homes overwhelmed by COVID-19

B.C. poison control sees spike in adults, children accidentally ingesting hand sanitizer

Hand sanitizer sales and usage have gone up sharply amid COVID-19 pandemic

Most Read